Inland Regional Hospice

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So far Inland Regional Hospice has created 6 blog entries.

IE Business Daily

Inland Regional Hospice is encouraging longer stays and more interaction with family members. The goal is to make hospice care more than a one or two-week ordeal at the very end of life, but convincing people to take that approach can be difficult. When he opened Inland Regional Hospice in Corona one year ago, Florin Rominu knew he didn’t want to run a conventional end-of-life facility. Why, he thought, did a hospice have to be restricted to the last week or two of a person’s life? Why couldn’t hospice treatment be expanded to the last few months of the person’s life, so they could be as comfortable as possible while coping with a life-ending illness? At the same time, it would be good idea to bring the person’s family into the picture, counsel them and let them have more of a say in the end-of-life treatment. Why not offer them counseling after their loved one is gone? Wouldn’t all of that make it easier for people to deal with the loss when the end finally came? Inland Regional’s goal would be the same as any hospice: not to speed up or postpone death but to welcome it. The difference would be a less stressful and more drawn out process, not one jammed into one or two weeks, which is closer to the average hospice stay. “I saw the need for a new business, because it was clear to me that the hospice stay wasn’t doing everything it could for our patients,” said Rominu, who worked in the printing business before he changed careers and opened an assisted living facility in Bloomington in 2003. “The people working in the facility didn’t know the patients, and the [...]

By | March 23rd, 2015|News & Articles|Comments Off on IE Business Daily

IE Business Daily

Inland Regional Hospice in Corona wants to make hospice care a longer process, with more counseling and a stronger role for family members. A woman whose father spent his final days with Inland Regional believes there’s merit to that approach. Donna Zuppan remembers the exact moment she knew her father, Ronald Darbyshire, would have to enter a hospice. Zuppan, a Yucaipa resident, was spending as much time as she could at her father’s house about one mile away, where he lived by himself. “He didn’t like going to doctors,” Zuppan said of her father, a native of England who had just turned 96 when he passed away last Nov. 1. “He was still pretty sharp mentally, but he was deteriorating physically. I was doing as much as I could for him, but it was a real strain.” One morning last September, on one of her regular morning visits, Zuppan found her father sitting in his recliner, alert but bruised and bleeding from multiple cuts. “He’d fallen near the kitchen, and I could tell he spent most of the night on floor,” said Zuppan a retired nurse. “Somehow he got up and got to the recliner, probably not long before I got there. “Right then I knew I would have to do something. I wouldn’t be able to care for him anymore.” Zuppan immediately got her father into an assisted living facility in Calimesa, and suggested that her father be placed in hospice care. “They wanted to wait, because some people improve when they go into hospice and then they get discharged,” Zuppan said. “But after a couple of days it was obvious he wasn’t going to get better, and that he needed hospice care.” Zuppan [...]

By | March 23rd, 2015|News & Articles|Comments Off on IE Business Daily

The Press Enterprise

It has been said that a hero is an ordinary individual who finds the strength to persevere and endure in spite of overwhelming obstacles. The heroes in my life are the patients and families we care for and treat at my hospice agency. As an assisted living facility owner, with specialization in residential board and care, and hospice administrator, I have had the opportunity to help patients and their families over the years. Some continue services longer than others, but they all have one thing in common: the desire to make the most out of their lives and to leave this earth with some sense of dignity. Being in the hospice business has taught me to value the life I live and to cherish my family and friends. Many people think of hospice care as simply end-of-life care. The reality? Hospice is so much more than that. Seeking hospice services earlier, rather than later, allows families to begin to cope with the bereavement process. Terminally ill patients are able to stay in the comfort of their own home or place where they reside, wherever that may be, while they live out the rest of their days. In many instances, hospice services extend a patient’s life, giving them more time with family and friends. I have seen patients lives extended by weeks, months and, occasionally, years, because their family sought hospice care sooner, rather than later. Not only did the patient live longer, but it was less of a financial burden on the family and the overall health care system. Terminally ill patients who aren’t on hospice are frequently in and out of the hospital, which ties up doctors and nurses from treating patients with urgent, [...]

By | March 23rd, 2015|News & Articles|Comments Off on The Press Enterprise

IE Business Daily

The Affordable Care Act of 2010 has something to say about end-of-life treatment, but how much the federal healthcare program will impact that industry remains to be seen. Only two things appear certain now: more paperwork, and a lot of confusion. Like every aspect of healthcare, the hospice industry is trying to determine what impact the Affordable Care Act will have on its day-to-day operations. With some of the federal healthcare reform – better known as Obamacare – already in place, there are differing opinions about what the new law means for end-of-life care. Florin Rominu, founder and chief administrator of Inland Regional Hospice in Corona, believes most of the changes will be clerical. Unlike other elements of the healthcare industry – hospitals, for example – the ACA isn’t likely to overwhelm hospices with major changes, Rominu said. At least not anytime soon. “If you look at the [Affordable Care Act], it doesn’t say too much about hospices or hospice care,” said Rominu, who also owns and operates two assisted living facilities in Redlands. “The main difference is it requires more detailed reporting on a patient’s condition. Most of this we didn’t have to do before.” Rominu is referring in part to the ACA’s Hospice Quality Reporting Requirement, which became mandatory for all hospices on Oct. 1, four years after the first part of the Affordable Care Act became law. No more than fourteen days after a patient is admitted to a hospice, hospice officials must submit to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services a report on the person’s medical status at the time of admission. The data is used to determine what kind of treatment a person will receive. The hospice has 30 [...]

By | March 23rd, 2015|News & Articles|Comments Off on IE Business Daily

Redlands Daily Facts

REDLANDS - While the Redlands Community Hospital generally concentrates on saving lives, its Home Health and Hospice Services department focuses on the other side of things - making sure that people are comfortable at the end of life. On a regular visit to check on their Hospice patients, Hospice case manager Angella Waller and Hospice and Home Health director Gerry Smith paid a visit to a Hospice care facility in Redlands on Wednesday afternoon. Waller sat and visited with two elderly dementia patients at a European Home Care facility, checking on their well being, while Smith checked in with facility owner Mina Rominu. Rominu and her husband, Florin, turned their home into a home care facility about 10 years ago after Florin had difficulty finding boarding for his dying grandfather. "November is National Home Care and Hospice month," said Smith. "It allows time to recognize individuals who have dedicated themselves to this kind of work. "Our slogan at Redlands Community Hospital is to take care of generations, the whole continuum of care," she said. The Hospice program helps make patients as comfortable as possible in their last years or months, in a wide variety of ways. "Hospice is holistic," Smith said, explaining that doctors and care providers use music, therapeutic touch, quiet atmospheres, pet therapy and other methods, in addition to medication, "to find what works for individual patients. "It's a collaborative effort," she said. "It's not just cookie cutter medicine." While many Hospice patients suffer from dementia, as the two Waller visited with on Wednesday, some are even younger, and dying from cancer or other terminal illnesses. And Hospice care doesn't end with the patient's death, Waller said. "We follow our families 13 months [...]

By | November 13th, 2013|News & Articles|Comments Off on Redlands Daily Facts

Redlands Daily Facts

Nursing homes are for the elderly. So what happens when you age? Your mind is still active and inside you still feel 40 (or 50!). But the years will pass and one day you might wake up and it seems that suddenly you need help dressing, or bathing. Or, maybe it just feels like too much work to cook or keep the house as neat as it used to be. Despite what your biological age says, you know that you’re just too young to be in a nursing home. The good news is that there are options available to seniors empowering them to be their own decision makers; and to yes, stay in their own home. Home care empowers seniors to remain independent. I mean really! Who wants to be dependent on the schedule of a nursing home? You want your meals when you want them. You want full control over the TV remote, and to go outside for a walk when you want to go. Senior home care allows you to remain in control of your daily schedule. Home care empowers seniors to have personalized treatment. Nursing homes are good for taking care of our loved ones when 24 hours care is needed. But these homes must consider the group as a whole, and coordinate care for the entire home population. Senior home care coordinates treatment for you only, for your individual needs. There is no waiting your turn for help with a shower, or for your daily medications. Receiving care at home means it is all about you. Home care empowers seniors by keeping families together. Whether you’ve been married for 50 years, or just found the love of your life 10 years [...]

By | November 13th, 2013|News & Articles|Comments Off on Redlands Daily Facts